Yamato Miyatake

Yamato Miyatake

Software Engineer (Radar and camera system)

Bosch Japan

Biography

Yamato Miyatake is a software engineer at Bosch Japan, Cross-domain computing solutions. He has an experience in sensor development for driver assistance/automated driving. This consists of radar and camera perception development.

His research experience includes visuo-haptic interface and 3D food printing. He developed a projection-based visuo-haptic interface and a data embedding system inside food using a 3D food printer at Sato laboratory at Osaka University.

Interests

  • AR/VR/MR
  • HCI
  • Haptics

Education

  • MSc in Engineering, 2022

    Osaka University

  • BSc in Engineering, 2020

    Osaka University

Experience

 
 
 
 
 

Software Engineer (Environment recognition system)

Bosch Japan

Apr 2022 – Present Kanagawa, Japan
 
 
 
 
 

R&D Engineer (Intern)

Sony

Feb 2021 – Mar 2021 Tokyo, Japan
 
 
 
 
 

Engineer (Intern)

JAXA

Sep 2017 – Oct 2017 Ibaraki, Japan
 
 
 
 
 

Web Developer (Intern)

APCAS

Mar 2016 – Apr 2016 Colombo, Sri Lanka

Recent Publications

(2022). 3Dプリント食品内部への情報埋め込み. 情報処理学会 第84回全国大会講演論文集.

(2020). HaptoMapping: Visuo-Haptic AR System using Projection-based Control of Wearable Haptic Devices. In ACM SIGGRAPH Asia 2020 Emerging Technologies.

PDF Project

(2020). Visuo-Haptic Display by Embedding Imperceptible Spatial Haptic Information into Projected Images. Haptics: Science, Technology, Applications (Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Human Haptic Sensing and Touch Enabled Computer Applications – EuroHaptics 2020).

PDF Project

(2020). HaptoMapping: 映像への不可視な情報埋め込みによる視触覚重畳提示. 情報処理学会 インタラクション2020論文集.

PDF Project

Projects

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HaptoMapping

HaptoMapping is a projection-based visuo-haptic augmented reality (VHAR) system, that can render visual and haptic content independently and present consistent visuo-haptic sensations on physical surfaces. HaptoMapping controls wearable haptic displays by embedded control signals that are imperceptible to the user in projected images using a pixel-level visible light communication technique.